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Team Jenkins  › Roscoe Ewing Park   February 16, 2013 at 6:55pm





MEDINA – As an isolated wooded area located north of Sam Masi Park and west of Roscoe Ewing Park, nothing much has been done to the area known as Nichols Park, until recently.



The extension of the Champion Creek Trail into the area from Roscoe Ewing Park has led to more people in the area, but also has led to more vandalism and trash piling up there.



“I have concerns for the safety of the walkers,” said Parks Director Tim Swanson during a Public Properties committee meeting at City Hall Feb. 5.



To increase visibility and bring more people to the area, he proposed putting in a 12-hole disc golf course. He said the department has already purchased 18 hole baskets for $6,700, with the extras being used during tournaments or as replacements.



The course would start on the west side of the park near Sam Masi park and wind around east towards Guilford Boulevard.



Swanson said he thought of the idea after two disc golf holes had to be taken out at Roscoe Ewing Park due to players cutting out parts of the fence owned by the railroad to access the holes.



The 17-acre area known as Nichols Park was purchased by the city in 1996 for $185,000.



Ward 3 Councilman Mark Kolesar, who represents the area, said he has received calls from residents concerned about the park’s future and conflicts between walkers and golfers. He was in favor of just having the trail there and possibly adding education stations in the future.



“People like to see something untouched,” he said.



In addition, Kolesar wanted to see the trail have ADA-access since Sam Masi is where the city’s Challenger baseball league for children with disabilities plays their games.



The trail there is named after Harold Thoborn, who was the chair of the city’s Shade Tree Commission for many years and responsible for the planting of many new trees throughout the city.



Other possible plans for the area include creating learning stations on the trail and the creation of an arboretum.



Councilman Jim Shields, committee chair, said he wanted to ensure Thoborn’s widow was involved in the plans and approved of them before going further.



Also speaking during the meeting was Leroy and Sharon Jenkins, who manage the disc golf courses at both Roscoe Ewing and the “junior” course at Memorial Park. They said there was enough land at Nichols Park to build a course while making sure the play would not interfere with trail walkers. However, some thorny bushes and trees would likely have to be removed before the holes can be made.



Kolesar accepted an invitation from the Jenkinses to walk around the area before anything is cleared.









To increase visibility and bring more people to the area, he proposed putting in a 12-hole disc golf course. He said the department has already purchased 18 hole baskets for $6,700, with the extras being used during tournaments or as replacements.



The course would start on the west side of the park near Sam Masi park and wind around east towards Guilford Boulevard.



Swanson said he thought of the idea after two disc golf holes had to be taken out at Roscoe Ewing Park due to players cutting out parts of the fence owned by the railroad to access the holes.



The 17-acre area known as Nichols Park was purchased by the city in 1996 for $185,000.



Ward 3 Councilman Mark Kolesar, who represents the area, said he has received calls from residents concerned about the park’s future and conflicts between walkers and golfers. He was in favor of just having the trail there and possibly adding education stations in the future.



“People like to see something untouched,” he said.



In addition, Kolesar wanted to see the trail have ADA-access since Sam Masi is where the city’s Challenger baseball league for children with disabilities plays their games.



The trail there is named after Harold Thoborn, who was the chair of the city’s Shade Tree Commission for many years and responsible for the planting of many new trees throughout the city.



Other possible plans for the area include creating learning stations on the trail and the creation of an arboretum.



Councilman Jim Shields, committee chair, said he wanted to ensure Thoborn’s widow was involved in the plans and approved of them before going further.



Also speaking during the meeting was Leroy and Sharon Jenkins, who manage the disc golf courses at both Roscoe Ewing and the “junior” course at Memorial Park. They said there was enough land at Nichols Park to build a course while making sure the play would not interfere with trail walkers. However, some thorny bushes and trees would likely have to be removed before the holes can be made.



Kolesar accepted an invitation from the Jenkinses to walk around the area before anything is cleared.



The extension of the Champion Creek Trail into the area from Roscoe Ewing Park has led to more people in the area, but also has led to more vandalism and trash piling up there.



“I have concerns for the safety of the walkers,” said Parks Director Tim Swanson during a Public Properties committee meeting at City Hall Feb. 5.



To increase visibility and bring more people to the area, he proposed putting in a 12-hole disc golf course. He said the department has already purchased 18 hole baskets for $6,700, with the extras being used during tournaments or as replacements.



The course would start on the west side of the park near Sam Masi park and wind around east towards Guilford Boulevard.



Swanson said he thought of the idea after two disc golf holes had to be taken out at Roscoe Ewing Park due to players cutting out parts of the fence owned by the railroad to access the holes.



The 17-acre area known as Nichols Park was purchased by the city in 1996 for $185,000.



Ward 3 Councilman Mark Kolesar, who represents the area, said he has received calls from residents concerned about the park’s future and conflicts between walkers and golfers. He was in favor of just having the trail there and possibly adding education stations in the future.



“People like to see something untouched,” he said.



In addition, Kolesar wanted to see the trail have ADA-access since Sam Masi is where the city’s Challenger baseball league for children with disabilities plays their games.



The trail there is named after Harold Thoborn, who was the chair of the city’s Shade Tree Commission for many years and responsible for the planting of many new trees throughout the city.



Other possible plans for the area include creating learning stations on the trail and the creation of an arboretum.



Councilman Jim Shields, committee chair, said he wanted to ensure Thoborn’s widow was involved in the plans and approved of them before going further.



Also speaking during the meeting was Leroy and Sharon Jenkins, who manage the disc golf courses at both Roscoe Ewing and the “junior” course at Memorial Park. They said there was enough land at Nichols Park to build a course while making sure the play would not interfere with trail walkers. However, some thorny bushes and trees would likely have to be removed before the holes can be made.



Kolesar accepted an invitation from the Jenkinses to walk around the area before anything is cleared.